Etiquette Tip of the Month

Cultural Awareness: Celebrating National Days

Do you know when the National Day of your country of origin is celebrated? How about that of the colleague sitting near you? In countries all over the world, National Day is among the most important celebrations of the year.

Begin your journey toward international understanding by learning about the National Day celebrations around the globe. Knowing the date of your country of origin's National Day is a fun and easy way to learn its history, and something about your family, as well. Learning about the National Day of a country with which you do business, or the native nation of your co-workers, friends, neighbors, colleagues, and relatives, is an excellent way to gain an understanding of their culture.

Except for people of Native American heritage, everyone in the United States is an immigrant from another place. The wealth of diversity in our country is unique to all the world and, to me, it definitely enriches my life beyond all measure.

As an American of Chinese heritage, I've learned that October 1 is the National Day in the People's Republic of China (PRC), and that the Republic of China (ROC), also known as Taiwan, celebrates Double Ten National Day on October 10. The PRC National Day marks the anniversary of the 1949 founding of the People's Republic of China. It is the most important of China's official holidays, celebrated over an entire week. For further details on China, see http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cntoc.html

In the ROC, October 10th commemorates the Wuchang Uprising that signaled the Chinese people to rebel against the Manchu court. Although the official founding day is January 1, 1912, the events on October 10, 1911 are considered the spark that brought down the Manchu dynasty and led to the establishment of the ROC. For further details on the ROC, see http://www.taipei.org/teco/cicc/currents/11-1299/index/ten.html

Some time this month, take a few minutes out of your busy life to reflect on your heritage by finding out the date and traditions of the National Day of your country of origin. Explore online, look on calendars, or check history books for information. To document how your own family traditionally celebrated these National Days, check with elder family members who are most likely a wealth of knowledge.

To find out about other cultures, ask your friends, co-workers, and colleagues how they celebrate their National Days. Sharing stories about these time-honored experiences and traditions, here and elsewhere, are what weaves the fabric of our American quilt.

When it comes to business, take time to learn all you can about the countries and cultures of your clients and customers. Make sure to note when these colleagues celebrate their National Day and be sure to acknowledge it in correspondence and when scheduling work projects.

To follow is a partial List of October National Days as seen on National Days Around the Word at http://www.nnsw.com.au/regional/national_days.html

1 China: National Day
1 Cyprus: National Day
1 Nigeria: Republic Day
1 Palau: National Day
1 Tuvalu: Independence Day
2 Guinea: National Day
3 Germany: National Day
4 Lesotho: National Day
9 Uganda: Independence Day
10 Fiji: National Day
12 Equatorial Guinea: National Day
12 Spain: National Day
19 Niue: National Day
21 Somalia: The 21st of October Revolution
24 Zambia: Independence Day
26 Austria: National Day
27 St. Vincent and the Grenadines: National Day
27 Turkmenistan: National Day
28 Czech Republic: National Day
29 Turkey: Republic Day

 

 

 

 

Have fun discovering and learning!


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